One Heart, One Mind – A Cry and a Flood of Solidarity

At two-twenty one morning, after a week of horrific news from Standing Rock, Washington, Aleppo, ecosystems of the world, I was numbly clicking through Facebook posts so I didn’t have to go to bed, lie there staring at the ceiling, and possibly get waylaid by the despair that had been building in me since….I’m not sure when, probably since the brutal attacks started at Standing Rock.

After Findhorn: What Now?

We’ve all had the experience: going to a powerful workshop or retreat, having a “mountaintop” experience, then returning home….and the working-day world engulfs us. How to keep that high-altitude clarity, much less implement it?

So what has been happening in the months since I went to Findhorn?

On the most superficial level, the work I’m already doing has kicked into high gear, with a strong nudge from Spirit to polish up my Reiki attunements to turn longtime casual energy work for animals into an actual practice (set to launch September 1); and approval to participate in the Pachamama Alliance’s GameChanger Intensive. On a private level, I am continuing my permaculture work, integrating the Findhorn experiences of nature-spirit communication.

REBLOGGING: “Mutiny of the Soul” by Charles Eisenstein

Charles Eisenstein‘s essay, examining the chasm that yawns between the social definition of a good life versus the soul’s definition, and our body’s paths of rebellion against the soulless life mandated by society, is critical reading for our time….particularly for anyone who struggles with depression, anxiety, or chronic-fatigue dis-eases (or, I might add, physical or psychological addiction). What are the messages our wise bodies are trying to convey?

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Mutiny of the Soul

Mutiny of the Soul

 

Depression, anxiety, and fatigue are an essential part of a process of metamorphosis that is unfolding on the planet today, and highly significant for the light they shed on the transition from an old world to a new.

It’s Kitten Season!

This is a public service announcement…

We are right in the middle of “Kitten Season” when every rescue organization and shelter is overrun with adorable bundles of fur.

Because of this overwhelm, many shelters can only keep the kittens for a very few days before putting them to sleep. So, at this time of year, taking feral cats or kittens to a shelter can be a virtual certain death sentence. Dedicated foster caregivers are worth their weight in gold.

It’s particularly tough for adult feral cats who have not been hand-trained…in most cases, they are considered “unadoptable” and put to sleep immediately because there simply aren’t the resources to hold them safely, much less domesticate them!

Please Add Your Voice to Protect Key Sacred Site in Aboriginal Songline

Please ACT, and repost on your blog if you have one!

Imagine your country’s national library – all the history of your nation and culture – as a living archive hand-carved by your ancestors into the stones at sacred sites around the perimeter of your nation, each site holding a precious, unique and irreplaceable piece of your people’s ancestral wisdom.

Imagine generations of your family visiting these sacred sites for family rites of passage, births, deaths, comings of age. Imagine your nation’s spiritual heritage being recorded and celebrated at these sites.

Imagine this happening for centuries – millennia – for your entire nation.

REBLOGGING: Highly Recommended: National Grieving Day

The following is reblogged from the website of the Rev. Dr. Matthew Fox:

We don’t deal well with grief in our culture. We are expected to move on quickly after our losses. But when we don’t take the time to acknowledge and deal with our grief, that grief builds up, anger builds up, joy and love are lost, creativity is stifled, and despair enters in.

And who cannot be grieving today about what’s happening to the earth and to the beings of the earth?

Loving Circle for the Earth II

Loving Circle for the Earth – Stony Run Park & Wherever You Are

Friends, as we’re approaching Thanksgiving, our thoughts turn toward honoring the gifts of the Earth that sustain us.

And so many of us are so devastatingly aware of the headlines of species extinguished or on the verge…the hemorrhages of radioactive water at Fukushima, of oil in the Gulf, and of bitumen at the Tar Sands; the ongoing razing of the rainforests of the South and boreal forests of the North; the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines coupled with the non-response in the Warsaw summit – I have heard so many others expressing similar feelings of overwhelm.

Earth Day Circle

My first circle, at an urban healing center, focused on evoking participants’ most profound experiences of nature. Most of the healers, homemakers, and young professionals recounted idyllic moments during solitary wilderness expeditions, camping vacations or honeymoons. Two homeless participants spoke of the everyday details of their lives out-of-doors: finding shelter and protection under trees in an empty lot; hunting and fishing for fish and small game in an urban park. The last participant to speak was a young mother, who gestured to her child and the other children in the circle, saying that her most profound experience of nature was giving birth – but did that count?

Death and Ceremony on Sacred Land

Nearly four years ago, I witnessed a tiny, shattering microcosm of the destruction being wreaked on the Earth. I was sitting by the fire-circle of my husband’s teacher (“Coyote”)’s sweatlodge, at the edge of a forest where he had often conducted vision quests…sacred land consecrated by years of ceremony. And now this land was under threat: the legal owners wanted the trees logged and sold so they could get double the value of the wetland before they sold it for development. Legal steps had been taken, counter-offers made to preserve the land, with no result. The loggers were due to move in soon.

  • All content (barring Quotes and reblogs) is (c) Phila Hoopes, 2010 -